Wu Wanders & Wonders

Sonder (n.) the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with his/her own ambitions, friends, routines, worries, and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you (Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows)

No Time to Think - NYTimes.com

A little ironic that I read these types of articles to think about thinking…

“Much of Hamlet is about the precise kind of slippage the mourner experiences: the difference between being and seeming, the uncertainty about how the inner translates into the outer, the sense that one is expected to perform grief palatably. (If you don’t seem sad, people worry; but if you are grief-stricken, people flinch away from your pain.)”

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Meghan O’Rourke on how Hamlet can helps us through grief and despair.

O’Rourke’s moving memoir of losing her mother is a must-read for anyone who has ever lost a loved one or ever will – which is just about all of us capable of love.

(via explore-blog)

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think. Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report, however … researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed… it’s seven hours of sleep.

The usual caveats apply, and these findings should be taken with a grain of salt. But the results are interesting—especially if you’re the kind of person who struggles with sluggishness throughout the day.

"The lowest mortality and morbidity is with seven hours," [says] Shawn Youngstedt, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University Phoenix… "Eight hours or more has consistently been shown to be hazardous."

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Intriguing new study on the optimal amount of sleep. But that grain of salt can’t be overstated given the wide variation of “chronotypes” and internal time.

Also see the science of what actually happens while you sleep and how it affects your every waking moment.

(via explore-blog)

My 14-Hour Search for the End of TGI Friday's Endless Appetizers

Best. Article. Ever.

Getting Over Procrastination

My 14-Hour Search for the End of TGI Friday's Endless Appetizers

This is amazing

"As a university tutor in my hometown, a city which is roughly 40% black and 37% white, I still had students asking me, “Do they just never learn how to talk right?” I pull up a chair when this happens, “Listen up, gang.” So what do I tell them? Well, the goal is to convey that, scientifically speaking, non-standard varieties of English such as the English spoken by Rachel Jeantel and the ‘proper English’ they’ve been taught are equally communicative. I go over the differences and point out that both have a rule system that must be followed to speak convincingly.

But then, I don’t see why there should need to be that justification. So I end up trying to teach respect. If they have a student that speaks a non-standard variety of English, they need to understand that that student is therefore competent in understanding at least two versions of English: the version they speak at home and other safe environments, and the one forced upon them when listening to you.

Respect that.

The alarmingly pervasive idea that standard English equates to ‘good grammar’ and non-standard English equates to ‘bad grammar’ is false and exclusionary. When it’s used in conjunction with intelligence and credibility of a young black woman, it’s reminiscent of the faulty scientific racism of “The Bell Curve.” But language shaming is currently acceptable behavior in the status quo. It is one of the last bastions of unabashed racism and classism.”

newyorker:

Jill Lepore on how “The Star-Spangled Banner” became America’s national anthem: http://nyr.kr/1n0EUOp
Illustration by Simone Massoni.

newyorker:

Jill Lepore on how “The Star-Spangled Banner” became America’s national anthem: http://nyr.kr/1n0EUOp

Illustration by Simone Massoni.

(Source: newyorker.com)

“Maybe it would be easier to navigate the dissolving boundaries between public and private spaces if we all had a variety of names with which to signal the aspects of ourselves currently on display. And maybe we should remember that our first glimpse of a person is just one small piece of who they really are”

The Confidence Code: Another self-help book for rich, successful women.

Do we really need this much coaching on confidence?